Mineral Springs Park - Emlenton, PA

Mineral Springs Park - Emlenton, PA

Mineral Springs Park is a small park centered along Richey Run just outside of Emlenton, PA. The park has picnic areas, and fishing and trail access along the creek. Camping is also allowed at the park provided that you get permission ahead of time. You can inquire via The Borough Office at 724-867-8611.

Trail / Park Info:

Length: My best guestimate is just shy of 1.2 miles round trip if you park at the entrance and walk to the pavilion and then back.

Parking: Four different parking areas are available at various points along the road/trail, with a parking area for at least six cars at the beginning of the park, and another 4 plus at the end.

Directions on PCs: Locate the Google map below the search box on the right-hand side of this webpage. Click “Get Directions” on the map pin details.

Directions on Tablets and Mobile Phones: Locate the Google map near the bottom of this page, just below the search box. Click “Get Directions” on the map pin details.

The entrance and gates to the park.

Mineral Springs Park is a small park centered along Richey Run just outside of Emlenton, PA. The park has picnic areas, and fishing and trail access along the creek. Camping is also allowed at the park provided that you get permission ahead of time. You can inquire via The Borough Office at 724-867-8611.

Richey Run has lots of large rocks along the banks, with a few knee-high waterfalls, and cool shallow pools.

Picnic table and fire ring next to the creek.

The park often has a car or two parked here and there, often a fisherman or at least a dog with its accompanying family in or near the water.

Near the mouth of the park, there is an oil well that is still capable of producing oil, over 150 years after it was drilled in 1867. You can buy an 8oz. bottle of this crude by visiting The Pumping Jack Museum in Emlenton.

At various points along the creek, you can see the reason for the park’s name as minerals emanate from below and spill into the creek. This water is not drinkable, not directly, and not even if boiled.

A one-lane bridge over Richey Run

About a mile from the entrance, you will find the main spring and its rust-colored water. Although it’s pretty neat to look at, this water is not safe to drink!

At the end of the road, there is a walking bridge over Richey Run. The bridge springs a bit as you pass over it. From the other side you can walk to a pavilion for picnics or rest, then walk around for a close look at the spring.

I find myself wondering why go to all the trouble to build this stone wall around a spring that has water that isn’t drinkable? I’d be pretty interested in any possible explanations, so please do drop a comment if you have a guess or know the reason.

The park is small, and a great side trip. The valley and the trees’ effects to cool and shade the valley make it much cooler than other places on a bright summer day.

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